Oh, they’ve gone and done it again. The genius designers at Suunto have just announced their 9 model, with a huge focus on not just battery life, but letting you know exactly how to manage the watch to get everything you need in the time the battery has left. It might sound simple, but one of the biggest issues with long distance, or multi stage events is losing that battery before your legs give out. In the advent of adventure races becoming more accessible (cough RatRace cough), it might be a worthy investment for even the likes of us!

As well as being able to do the usual things; log training, general activity and sleep, the watch is designed to adapt to what you need it for. There are three battery modes: performance, endurance and ultra. Depending on what you need, the battery will last from 25 to a staggering 120 hours, even with GPS turned on. Possibly the coolest thing is that you can create a custom mode, and the watch will let you know how long you have and offer you more economical options instead of just silently slipping away at mile 98 of a 100 mile slog.

Not only is it extremely energy conscious, but it cleverly combines information from both GPS and a motion sensor, to try to pinpoint your position on a trail. This saves battery drain from relying solely on GPS, which, as we all know, can be comically off track during some obstacle races and in remote areas. This leads to much more accurate tracking of your distance, ensuring that what you save to your profile actually reflects what you've achieved.

Of course, you can expect all of the usual Suunto toys like heart rate monitoring and, incredibly, it also tells the time, but how many watches do you know that have a built in storm warning? This is some superhero nonsense.

Also, and forgive us for this, but HOW PRETTY?

The Suunto 9 will be available from June 26th. At the minute, information suggests it will retail at 599 Euro, but we will be getting one in to test, and shall keep you posted.

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Ami is the Editor of Mudstacle, but moonlights as a farm animal vet, so basically she's perpetually dirty.

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